Thunder Road.

The screen door slams,
Mary’s dress waves
Like a vision she dances
across the porch as the radio plays

Continue reading “Thunder Road.”

You Don’t Want to Build All Models from Scratch, Do You?

This is a very interesting article by Wang Zhao about fundamental blocks of System Dynamics archetypes in elaborated detail, posted by @YoungModeler.

For everyone new to the topic, a simple overview of the basic feedback loops that are common to Business Model Generation as well can be found on Wikipedia’s article about System Archetypes. As well, the basic picture of those interacting Problems-and-Success Models can be found within each Dynamic Application.

Building World Models, altogether. A great topic to discuss.

I found that management picutre on German Wikipedia, translated the picture to English, called it “Balanced Scorecard – Management”, and added that picture to the top right icons in Dynamic Applications. Finally, i’ve uploaded it to the english article on System Archetypes at Wikipedia. Where it resides until today.

How could such archetypes or “building blocks” be incorporated with Dynamic Applications? – your suggestions are highly appreciated.

For everyone interested in more detailed building blocks, see PDF Attachment at the bottom of the article by @YoungModeler, reblogged below.

Young Modeler

By Wang Zhao
Located in Lisbon, Portugal
European Master in System Dynamics candidate 2017-2019


Modellers face a problem: Too few of their models ever get reused. Meanwhile, many projects start by building a new model from scratch requiring plenty of research to conceptualize the model structure. If we see these two aspects from the perspective of ‘supply’ and ‘demand’, is there any ‘mismatch’ in between that hinders models from reuse? If so, what could be the reason?

Most system dynamics models

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of horses and innovation.

unconventional thoughts on the possibilities of funding a company in a more agile, energetic way.

ringbolt solutions.

interesting, interesting, and well-founded with links to read on.

an overview by Robert Koshinskie, a University’s Teacher in System Dynamics, from North Carolina. For a long time, working on Vensim, another competitor from 20th century. Somewhere on this planet, a small family of 2.

Much like ours.

..

https://youtu.be/2FkdleIkFyo

..

.

..

xx

it’s good

to have some friends,

after all, you know. we
don’t need to talk, every day.

in being Founders of 21st century,
we’re just connected to a few Mentors.

much like your head of department,
today.

and so, we’re all Pirates
deep in our heart, somewhere

we’re all United Pirates
of 21st century.

..

(c) we the people. (P).

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

ringbolt consulting services

Most businesses seem to be organized in a traditional pyramid hierarchy like a football team.  In this team model those at the top of the pyramid (coach/CEO) attempt to drive outcomes by “calling the plays” and expecting that the rest of the team follows a formal playbook.  This model has served the business world well by certain organizational measures, however, such organizations also may suffer when management from a distance confounds effective daily operations.

wrestlers

Top-down organizations are by no means the only way to achieve success as demonstrated by companies such as Semco where empowered teams can move forward confidently and independently.  Approaches such as Dynamic Governance facilitate the crafting of policy through inclusive decision-making that links team objectives to broad goals of the firm.  Teams are then permitted to achieve results through self-organization and management on a day-to-day basis without seeking or requiring further involvement from the executive level while observing policy that they helped formulate.

If traditional business organization is rightly analogous to…

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